Paul Mealor House composer

Paul Mealor's Ubi Caritas was the real hit of the Wedding..... The Ubi Caritas setting they did this morning had an austere resonance of plainsong that then flowered into the kind of cloudy harmonic suspensions of a Morten Lauridsen or Eric Whitacre ....... well put together and effective. ....... His Ubi Caritas was certainly the closest this wedding got to the nerve-touching John Tavener moment at the last big royal ceremonial that broadcast to the world...

The Telegraph, 30 April, 2011

What next for Paul Mealor? Until last week he was a relatively unheard of composer from North Wales. Now, after the royal couple chose his setting of Ubi Caritas as an anthem at their wedding, he's likely to find himself propelled into classical music stardom..... Expect to hear the name Paul Mealor a lot more.

Michael Bell, The Independent, 2011

This refashioning of Mealor's 2010 composition Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal was commissioned by Prince William. The piece is lovely in itself..... Mealor's aesthetic ...features open tone clusters, extended chords, slow-moving harmonic changes and divisi voicing. These techniques minimize any sense of a home key, which creates a sort of ethereal dissonance that doesn't feel as if it needs resolving. In this idiom, the color of the sound is more important than the shape of it...

Los Angeles Times, 2011

One of the most important composers to have emerged in Welsh music since William Mathias... a real and original talent.

New York Times, 2001

The highlight of the evening was Paul Mealor's Elegy for a Play of Shadows... a powerful and deeply moving monody for Cor Anglais and Ensemble. It is full of intense harmonic writing and wonderfully crafted tutti sections...

Edward Wainwright, Music On The Web, 2003
'Awesome' was the description one young concertgoer gave as his reaction to Mika Takehara's performance of Echo by Paul Mealor. With the wonderful throbbing intensity of its drumbeats and its use of startling vocalisations by the performer the whole audience were rocking with excitement - and me too!

Alan Cooper, The Leopard, 2004